Two-headed Rat Snake Finds Home At Catawba Science Center In NC

The Science Center is probably an ideal choice for the reptile to spend the rest of its life.
Two Headed Snake
A two-headed rat snake found in North Carolina by Jeannie Wilson. She posted a video and made it public on Facebook, asking where she should bring it. Photo by Jeannie Wilson/Facebook

A woman in Taylorsville, NC had twice the surprise last month when a two-headed rat snake (Elaphe sp.) crawled into her home. Jeannie Wilson captured the reptile and put the snake in a bucket, then posted a video of the snake(s) on her Facebook page, with the question “Ok facebook…anybody out there know of a place that would take Double Trouble here and care for him/her or should I turn it loose?

The snake, which looked to be in excellent health, eventually went to the Catawba Science Center in Hickory, after many people responded and gave recommendations to where the snake could be taken to.

The Science Center is probably an ideal choice for the reptile to spend the rest of its life, because scientists say that two-headed animals don’t usually do well in the wild. This way, children and visitors of the Science Center can learn about reptiles such as this snake, and better appreciate the role they play in reducing rodent populations.


Rat Snakes Of The United States

Corn Snake Care Sheet


Two-headed snakes are generally considered rare, but not uncommon. Over the years we have reported on two-headed monocled cobras, two-headed timber rattlesnakes, two-headed copperheads, and various other non-venomous snakes as well as two-headed lizards and even two-headed sea turtle hatchlings.

 

Ok facebook…anybody out there know of a place that would take Double Trouble here and care for him/her or should I turn it loose?..Its not poisonous

Posted by Jeannie Wilson on Sunday, September 27, 2020

Because they have an independent head, movement is often compromised, with one head wanting to go one way and the other wanting to go another. This makes them ideal for predation.
Rat snakes are some of the most beautiful native snakes in the United States. They are also some of the most widely captive-bred snakes and very popular in reptile keepers, especially for those new to reptilekeeping. Corn snakes (Elaphe guttata), which are also known as the red rat snake, are readily available and can be found at almost any big pet store or local reptile story. They are very inquisitive and come in a variety of colorations and morphs.

Categories: Snake Information & News